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What it Takes to Be an Electrician

Have you ever considered a career as an electrician? Let’s take a closer look into frequently asked questions to uncover what it takes to be an electrician at Lee.

  1. What schooling is required to become an electrician? After you earn a high school diploma, or equivalent, Lee welcomes applicants to apply for one of our electrical apprentice openings. Lee requires all apprentices attend a state-sponsored electrical apprenticeship program, which combines extensive on-the-job training and related classroom instruction. After four years, and 8,000 hours working under a master electrician as an apprentice, you are then eligible to take the journeyman test. Once you pass the test, many electricians will spend the duration of their career as a journeyman, or they work to become a master electrician. As a journeyman, you must work under a master electrician for two years and have 4,000 hours on the job before you are eligible to take the master electrician exam.
  2. What certifications are required? Anyone on an electrical crew in Michigan must have an apprentice, journeyman or master electrical license from the Department of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs.
  3. What types of projects do industrial electricians work on? You can gain a lot of experience as an industrial electrician. Projects vary depending on the industry. You may find yourself working in automotive, steel processing, battery manufacturing, testing, food and beverage, distribution, research and development, commercial build and more.
  4. What are the different types of industrial electrician jobs at Lee? There are many different positions available for those interested in industrial electrical work. Those positions include shop assistant, shop manager, purchaser, department manager, estimator, apprentice electrician, journeyman electrician, foreman, senior foreman and master electrician.
  5. How can electricians stay safe on the job? Lee provides all Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), including arc suits and clothing. All electricians at Lee are required to have NFPA 70E training to help avoid workplace injuries, as well as regular trainings provided by Lee’s in-house safety team.
  6. What is it like working as an electrician at Lee? Most of the electrical work performed by Lee is considered heavy industrial. Our electricians might find themselves disconnecting and reconnecting electrical components for a press move, upgrading power to a whole operation, performing a complete machine rewire and more! Additionally, Lee is a learning environment – all apprentices are enrolled in state electrical apprenticeship programs and work closely with experienced journeyman and master electricians. All employees have an opportunity for advancement within the company.

Interested in a career at Lee?  Learn more about what it’s like to work at Lee and view our current job openings here.

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Industrial Electrical Contractors

Industrial electricians are trained personnel who test, troubleshoot, install and repair electrical components and systems in an industrial plant or worksite. Electricians also need to read and interpret blueprints and must remain current on electrical code specifications.

Lee Contracting has a full staff of industrial electricians who install and troubleshoot electrical systems for our customers. Our electrical staff is complete with master electricians who can provide services ranging from routine plant maintenance all the way up to major electrical renovations. Our industry-leading modern equipment keeps our employees on the job instead of in the repair shop. Our key advantage is keeping a large electrical supply in-house for a quicker job turnaround and emergency service response.

Our highly-skilled staff of electricians are trained in:

  • Installation of standby generators: backup lighting panels, UPS systems and whole service backup power
  • Emergency generator services: 24/7, 365 days a year
  • Design and installation of primary power
  • 24/7, 365 days a year emergency repair to minimize your downtime
  • Control wiring specialist: from wiring upgrades to complete machine rewire
  • Complete industrial installation: electrical design, motor controls and transformers
  • Power quality monitoring: monitoring equipment to help determine and repair power quality issues
  • Infrared imaging: determine predictive maintenance
  • Complete commercial and industrial lighting installation

What sets Lee Contracting above other contractors?

Our electrical processes set us apart from other contractors but in combination with our turn-key solutions, Lee Contracting is Michigan’s leading contractor. Hiring a turn-key contractor is guaranteed to save you time and money. Our dedicated teams work across our 13 in-house capabilities to accelerate your schedule. From rigging your heavy equipment to completing utility hookups, our solutions provide cohesiveness in your schedule.

Get started on a quote for an upcoming project by filling out our online form. You can also call (888) 833-8776 to speak with a representative today.

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Lock Out Tag Out

Lockout/tagout refers to the procedures which keep employees safe from energized machinery and equipment.

Why are lockout/tagout procedures so important? Lockout devices hold energy-isolation devices in a safe or off position. They provide protection by preventing machines or equipment from becoming energized because they are positive restraints that cannot be removed without a key. Tagout devices are prominent warning devices that an authorized individual fastens to energy isolating devices to warn employees not to reenergize the machine.

If these procedures are not followed, employees can be seriously injured. At Lee we follow all OSHA standards to ensure the safety of our employees. How do we make sure our employees are safe? We follow our safety manual and hold mandatory training seminars upon employment. Some of our requirements are:

  • Each authorized employee has the proper number of locks and devices to be able to perform proper lockout/tagout for the machines and equipment that they may be working on.
  • All lockout or tag out devices must be affixed to each energy isolating device and indicate the name of the employee applying the device.
  • Lockout devices must be affixed in a manner to hold the energy isolating device in a safe or off position.
  • Tag out devices used with energy isolating devices with the capability of being locked out shall be fastened at the same point at which the lock would have been attached. If a tag cannot be directly attached to the energy isolation device it shall be located as close as safely as possible to the device in a position that will be immediately obvious to anyone attempting to operate the device.
  • Each energy source must be locked out completely isolating the equipment.

injury prevention tags These are only some of the items we follow to prevent injury. In keeping with our pledge to safety and health, we employ a safety manager with extensive experience in the development and maintenance of world-class programs. Our safety manager works closely with administrative and field personnel to ensure the company meets or exceeds safety regulations. With our mix of highly experienced safety representatives and our safety policies, we provide first-class services and first-class safety to our customers.

Learn more about our safety department today.

Call us today to request a free quote on your next industrial project, (888) 833-8776.

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Electricians – Stay Local

Any individual who is in the construction industry knows that contractors are in dire need of field staff. The need for trades workers doesn’t seem to be slowing down. Per the Bureau of Labor and Statistics, employment of electricians is projected to grow 9 percent from 2016 to 2026. Increases in construction spending and growing demand for alternative energy sources continues to drivelocal electrician demand for electricians. Many people choose to become an electrician because of the training, the pay and the benefits. In Michigan, the mean annual wage for electricians in 2017 was $54,110. Of course, this number increases with specialized training and years of service. After beginning your career as an electrician, promotions can include electrical engineer, cost estimator, electrical design engineer and master electrician. Master electricians can make $100,000 or more per year.

At Lee Industrial Contracting, we have a growing electrical department complete with master electricians who can provide services ranging from routine plant maintenance all the way up to major electrical renovations. Our industry-leading modern equipment keeps our employees on the job instead of in the repair shop. Our key advantage is keeping a large electrical supply in-house for a quicker job turnaround and emergency service response.

Our highly-skilled staff of electricians are trained in:

  • Installation of standby generators: backup lighting panels, UPS systems and whole service backup power
  • Emergency generator services: 24/7, 365 days a year
  • Design and installation of primary power
  • 24/7, 365 days a year emergency repair to get your shop back up and running, minimizing your downtime
  • Control wiring specialist: from wiring upgrades to complete machine rewire
  • Complete industrial installation: electrical design, motor controls and transformers
  • Power quality monitoring: monitoring equipment to help determine and repair power quality issues
  • Infrared imaging: determine predictive maintenance
  • Complete commercial and industrial lighting installation

local commercial electrician

As an electrician at Lee Contracting you can expect health benefits, competitive wages, paid vacation, company paid uniforms and our Employee Stock Ownership Plan. Our company provides room for growth and advancement within the company. If you like to travel, we have opportunities that will allow you to travel with port to port pay but if you like to work locally, you’ll be with your family every night.

You can learn more about our electrical department by visiting our website.

Check out our careers page and apply today to join our growing electrical department.

Call us today to request a free quote on your next industrial electrical project, (888) 833-8776.

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Electrical Safety

Electrical safety should be a continuing priority for every employee. Worksites are full of electrical safety hazards that must be observed. Basic ‘lockout/tagout’ and ‘test before touch’ procedures apply to every job. As industrial manufacturing plants get busier, it seems that open/free space always decreases. Per OSHA statistics, electrocutions account for 8.3% of construction deaths and control of hazardous energy (lockout/tagout) was the 5th most frequently cited OSHA standard in 2017. Employers and workers alike must work together to improve safe work practices and decrease the number of injuries and deaths caused by electrical accidents.

Free space in front of electrical equipment not only makes it easier to work, but it is also required. These requirements become a safety hazard when they are infringed upon by stored equipment and/or manufacturing materials. This space is designed to keep workers safe while completing electrical maintenance or upgrades. Care should be taken to protect yourself when working in these areas.

Before starting work, establishing an electrical shutdown plan or isolating the equipment should be the first topic of discussion. Per OSHA guidelines, electrical equipment must be de-energized before work is performed. With the customer having ample time to schedule the shutdown, work can be performed without major interruption to their facility. Limited approach boundaries and caution tape must also be set up per the National Fire Protection Association. The boundaries must be maintained while work is being performed.

Performing electrical work in unsafe conditions is never permitted. Remember that electrical hazards can be avoided if these policies & Electrical Safetyprocedures, among other policies, are followed.

Lee’s training programs keep our electricians safe on every job. To learn more about our electrical team, visit our website. Safety of our personnel and customers is always our top priority.

Call us today to request a free quote on your next industrial electrical project, 888.833.8776.

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Staying Safe Around Electricity

Electrical SafetyElectricity is essential on every one of our job sites. It is sometimes called the “silent partner” on the job. It supplies the power needed to run tools and machines, it provides lighting, and it powers heaters and air conditioning units. When used safely and properly, electricity makes our lives easier.

 

Electricity has also been called the “silent killer” because you don’t hear, see, taste, or smell it. If you use electricity carelessly or recklessly, if you overlook the many hazards it presents, you may be setting yourself up for injury or death from burns, falls, shocks, or electrocution.

 

To protect yourself from the hazards of electricity, keep the following safe work practices in mind:

 

  • Visually inspect electrical hand tools and extension cords before each use.
  • Immediately remove defective tools and cords before using.
  • Always wear the necessary PPE and use grounded or double-insulated tools.
  • Never handle an electrical tool by its power cord.
  • Only use extension cords that are rated for hard or extra hard use. Codes like S, ST, SO, STO, SJ, SJT, SJO & SJTO should be printed on the cords.
  • Take care of extension cords. Keep them out of the way to prevent damage.
  • Never yank cords to disconnect them. Reach down and pull the plug from the receptacle.
  • Don’t try to repair electrical cords or tools unless you are qualified and authorized to do so. Repairs should only be made by qualified electricians.
  • If you are authorized to make repairs, make sure you follow lockout/tagout procedures. Electrical Safety
  • When working in damp or wet areas, only use tools protected by a ground-fault circuit interrupter (GFCI).
  • Never operate electrical tools or equipment while standing in water.
  • Never use makeshift wiring.
  • Use 3-prong receptacles. Never break off the ground to fit an underground outlet.
  • Keep equipment and activities at a safe distance (at least 10 feet) when working around power lines.

 

Electrical SafetyAll of our electricians attend classes in NFPA 70E and MIOSHA Parts 33 & 40 “Electrical Safe Work Practices” instructional programs to ensure we are doing everything we can to prevent electrical injuries. We design, quote, layout, and execute electrical installations to follow electrical safe work practices. We provide high levels of PPE and test equipment for protection.

 

Whether you are at home or at work working with electricity remember to practice electrical safety and keep electricity as a silent partner in your projects.